Esri ArcGIS and ECM: The Science of Where and the Art of What

I have to confess that I love GIS technology. But before I knew what a geographical information system (GIS) was, I was the kid who took a hand-me-down globe from my older cousins and shoved everything off my desk to make space for it. This wasn’t great for my homework, but the globe described my world and I loved looking at it.

As a kid, I didn’t really think about what and who created that globe, I just knew that I loved maps and they were powerful visions of a world I wanted to understand.

The Science of Where

Earlier this week, I was lucky enough to be at the 2017 Esri Partner Conference, hearing about the latest tools within Esri’s ArcGIS 10.5. As always, the scope and functionality of the ArcGIS platform just keeps getting better. Whether you need 3D modeling, data insights or different deployment options, this latest ArcGIS platform is a worldwide phenomenon that gives governments and others the tools they need to make data-driven decisions rapidly and affordably.

The “Science of Where,” as Esri says, is a tool within the reach of government agencies to better understand current conditions and build smart communities. Esri’s platform makes it easier than ever to deploy solutions that produce data-driven outcomes that improve communities and the public policies that shape them.

“Where” meets “What”

It hasn’t escaped me that, to fit my globe on to my desk, I shoved aside paper.

Today, I work with enterprise content management (ECM), a platform that allows government to do the same – eliminate paper, speed up processes and manage information. Government is a content-driven sector and processes begin and end with paper or a digital version of paper documents. Government manages the records that are relied upon to order society, and that content is the “what” of government. It’s the basis for decisions on an individual interaction, varying by program, government level and mission.

With the “Science of Where,” agencies can combine policy decisions and program planning for the future with the “What” of government: the processes that define our relationships, the content we create (and collect) and the decisions we take as we govern. The variability of each interaction can make program delivery an art form.

That activity, with all its variations, is manageable and improved upon by the use of ECM. With a central repository, automation, case management systems and more, it’s an essential platform that builds smart communities by making government processes efficient and effective at the transactional level.

Data-driven policy benefits from the big-picture visualization and juxtaposition offered by Esri’s GIS platform. Layer after layer of information, displayed visually, helps government understand what is happening in their communities in new, broad ways. It is a central place to give data the stage it needs to persuade and inform overall public policy.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BRWN77EgBv-/

“Where” meets ECM

When ECM manages the “What” and is connected to GIS offering the “Science of Where,” you have a platform-to-platform synergy that describes effects, conditions and challenges to help create a better future while making government better each day. When you can access the content of government as data for the Esri platform, you affordably increase the datasets available to feed your analysis. Meanwhile, each of the platforms contributes key functionality for policy consideration.

As government strives for smart communities and navigates changing constituents, conditions and needs, it’s great to know that the “Science of Where” and the “Art of What” can combine to transform and improve public policy and program and service delivery – across the entire globe.

Terri Jones

Terri Jones

Wondering what goes into a document management or ECM software deployment in government? Terri Jones, Hyland's government marketing portfolio manager, has your answer. In her 10 plus years in both state and local government, she's managed IT departments, implemented ECM strategies and written legislation and program policies. If that isn't enough to prove her IT expertise in government, she has also designed and implemented data systems and websites to manage compliance and funding in excess of $90 million annually. Have a question for her? Contact her at terri.jones@onbase.com.

3 Responses

  1. RRichards says:

    In this type of platform to platform synergy you are describing, can you elaborate on the best strategies WHERE the “Where” (Geography) actually lives? In our ECM systems we seem to be moving geography into those platforms vs. geography living in GIS and “linking” to the ECM. It would interesting to get your take on this. .

  2. Terri Jones says:

    Thanks for the comment! My first thought is that your organization may have built some great GIS applications and by connecting them to OnBase, the content in OnBase offers another layer of data that increases the value of a GIS solution. In that case, it’s as you suggest, a link between two systems, each of which does what it does best. From OnBase, we can bring in base maps you have developed or that Esri provides and add a layer of data based on OnBase content. In that case, OnBase has spread the use of maps to staff that might spent most of their day in OnBase, but can use a geospatial view. A good example is mapping the applications received against the map of the community. A quick way to create a data layer without creating a data set that a GIS layer displays. I think this moves geography into ECM and it empowers government to have a GIS view when they cannot find the time and staff to create the data layers that content could represent. So, to answer your question about “best”, I think linking happens when you have a robust GIS program and would like to search from a map or consistently bring content-related layers into maps (e.g. bench warrants issued on a map for deputies to use to search warrants). In my other example, bringing geography into content is a powerful tool for staff to offer another view. Look for another blog post on this and thanks for your thoughts!!!

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